Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

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Expand view Topic review: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Keyser » Thu May 03, 2018 8:27 pm

I can see both sides here.

I am certainly against young women getting boob operations because they think they are not big enough - that does happen incredibly.

But if someone has put in years off effort to lose stone after stone then perhaps they deserve to have the operation. :dunno:

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Lady Murasaki » Thu May 03, 2018 1:28 pm

Foxy wrote:Good point, well made, but a tummy tuck involves tightening up muscles too. It's not only the skin that is stretched in obesity, the muscles are stretched too. Admittedly, I was primarily thinking of how far skin can stretch before it splits, as it can do in pregnancy - the skin becomes so thin that it can begin to tear. If a previously overweight person is left with excess skin after weight loss, has it removed, then regains a lot of weight, was interested to ponder on whether a similar thing can happen.


They would be seriously compromising their health if they kept putting the weight on after surgery. And anyone doing the surgery should refuse them or be struck off because the ‘patient’ obviously hasn’t learnt anything!

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Lady Murasaki » Thu May 03, 2018 1:25 pm

I don’t think the nhs can afford cosmetic surgery like this can it?

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Foxy » Wed May 02, 2018 9:59 pm

Good point, well made, but a tummy tuck involves tightening up muscles too. It's not only the skin that is stretched in obesity, the muscles are stretched too. Admittedly, I was primarily thinking of how far skin can stretch before it splits, as it can do in pregnancy - the skin becomes so thin that it can begin to tear. If a previously overweight person is left with excess skin after weight loss, has it removed, then regains a lot of weight, was interested to ponder on whether a similar thing can happen.

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Guest » Wed May 02, 2018 7:24 pm

Foxy wrote:What would happen if, after having excess skin removed, that person regains a large amount of weight? Presumably there is a limit to the skin's elasticity hence stretch marks during pregnancy? I'm wondering if there would be a higher risk of hernia.


hernias are caused by a split in muscle.

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Foxy » Wed May 02, 2018 7:17 pm

What would happen if, after having excess skin removed, that person regains a large amount of weight? Presumably there is a limit to the skin's elasticity hence stretch marks during pregnancy? I'm wondering if there would be a higher risk of hernia.

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Markey mark » Wed May 02, 2018 7:08 pm

Coming back to the the question about tummy tucks , know of 3 people that has lost large amounts of weight by have a gastric band fitted , I’m petty sure after losing weight they have had one option to have a operation in removing access skin either your arms or tummy , but not both , my sister in law had access skin removed from her arms on the nhs , she have to go private to have a tummy tuck now , unless you can persuad your doctor that you access skin is making you very depressed

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Markey mark » Wed May 02, 2018 6:58 pm

Yes me ex sister in law Linda was once 30 stone plus , she had a band thing fitted to lose weight, she lost nearly 11 stone , she covered in ulcers with puss leaking , her hair is falling out in handfuls too

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Vicks » Wed May 02, 2018 1:44 pm

Could you not get ulcers under the loose skin?

I saw an ulcer on a woman when I was in hospital once and I've never seen anything like it in my life.

It must have been so painful.

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by NastyNickers » Wed May 02, 2018 1:40 pm

Definitely.

Loose skin is more than just cosmetic. It can harbour all kinds of bacteria and moisture and turn really quite nasty if not given the proper care. Something which is difficult when your loose skin restricts movement.

There are degrees of loose skin and they should be treated as such. If it’s restricting movement or causing issues then I think it should be removed.

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Star » Wed May 02, 2018 1:18 pm

Definitely not. There isn’t enough money for regular operations.
If people want cosmetic surgery then they have to pay.
We might not even have an NHS in the future!!

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Guest » Wed May 02, 2018 12:40 pm

Gabby wrote:I disagree.... the NHS often won’t pay for life saving drugs/treatment for seriously ill people, including children.... so no, they should fund it themselves imo!

What’s next?.... ugly people wanting cosmetic surgery on the NHS, claiming its having an impact on their lives?.... bald men wanting a hair transplant on the NHS?

The line has to be drawn somewhere..... the NHS is knee deep in shit already!


...thanks to chronic underfunding since 2011 :shake head:

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Red Okktober » Wed May 02, 2018 12:30 pm

isn't there a simple formula here? The money saved by not buying copious amounts of junk food and drink any more, can go towards a tummy tuck op? Apart from having to buy some smaller clothes, they will find themselves much better off than they previously were.

Also I feel this 'excess skin' issue should be more widely publicised (leaflets at health centres/doctors surgeries etc) and serve as a warning for those in the process of letting themselves go. People should realise that when you get fat, there's more to getting healthy again than simply losing the weight.

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Dimples » Wed May 02, 2018 11:19 am

This is quite a tricky one, actually.

It's entirely understandable that people might feel that the NHS should not fund and carry out this sort of surgery - after all, it is considered to be largely "cosmetic".

However, there are plenty of instances where people's previous and current lifestyle choices have led to health issues for which the NHS ultimately picks up the tab - such as smoking related illnesses, alcohol-related illnesses and sporting injuries.

In the first instance, consider the individual who has actually lost all that weight. Some might have done it by dieting and exercise but some others might have gone down the route of weight loss surgery. Neither is an easy option, although some people think that weight loss surgery is. In fact, weight loss surgery is deemed to be a permanent solution but it means never being able to eat "normally" again. It's not REALLY that easy a route to go down.

Most people fund weight loss surgery themselves, so perhaps it's not unreasonable for the NHS to provide the surgery to remove excess skin as an adjunct to that, in order to improve their quality of life and restore a sense of normality and full function.

Some tummy tuck procedures are more than just removal of excess skin. Sometimes it involves tightening of the abdominal muscles too. That is a different kettle of fish in my opinion and that is perhaps not reasonable to be funded on the NHS except in exceptional cases. However, In all honesty, the simple removal of excess skin from abdomen, arms or legs is not a particularly complex surgical procedure and the costs for that should not be huge, whereas the benefit for such patients IS.

Re: Should Tummy Tucks Be Available On The NHS??

Post by Gabby » Wed May 02, 2018 10:25 am

I disagree.... the NHS often won’t pay for life saving drugs/treatment for seriously ill people, including children.... so no, they should fund it themselves imo!

What’s next?.... ugly people wanting cosmetic surgery on the NHS, claiming its having an impact on their lives?.... bald men wanting a hair transplant on the NHS?

The line has to be drawn somewhere..... the NHS is knee deep in shit already!

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