The End Of GMT?

Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Cannydc » Sun Oct 30, 2011 10:33 am

In 1968, there was a three-year experiment when British Standard Time (GMT + 1) was employed all year round; the clocks were advanced in March 1968 and not put back until October 1971.

This period provided an opportunity to evaluate the effect of the daylight change on a number of things, particularly road accident casualties.
A Parliamentary review of the experiment reported that it was impossible to quantify a great many of the more important advantages and disadvantages of this time system and concluded that the final decision on whether to retain the system would rest largely on a qualitative judgement.

There was a wealth of support for the proposal from some sections of the public (The Police Federation, The Sports Council, the leisure industry, Age Concern) but strong opposition from others (the building industry, farmers, the Post Office), particularly those in Scotland.

In 1998, a report, commissioned by the Government, examined the effect of a move to SDST on road accident casualties. This concluded there would be 450 fewer deaths and serious injuries... Every Autumn when the clocks go back and sunset occurs earlier in the day, road casualties and the casualty rate rise.

The effects of clocks going back in October are greatest for the most vulnerable road users. In 2004, pedestrian deaths rose from 56 in October to 76 in November and 78 in December.

During the week, casualty rates peak at 8:00 am and 5:00 pm for adults and 8:00 am and 3.30 pm for children, with the afternoon peak being higher for both the children and adults. The patterns are different at weekends for both adults and children, when casualty rates peak between 12 noon and 1:00 pm and then plateau until about 7:00 pm when they begin to reduce.

As an experiment, British Standard Time (GMT +1 hour) was kept all year round for a three year period between 1968 and 1971. Analysis of accident data during this period indicated that this reduced the number of road accident casualties.

Road casualty figures during the morning (7:00 am – 10:00 am) and afternoon (4:00 pm – 7:00 pm) for the period affected by time change in the two winters (1966/67 and 1967/68) before the experiment and in the first two winters (1968/69 and 1969/70) when BST was retained were analysed.

The data showed that keeping British Standard time had resulted in an 11% reduction in casualties during the hours affected by the time change in England and Wales and a 17% reduction in Scotland. The overall reduction for Great Britain was 11.7%. Although casualties in the morning had increased, the decrease in casualties in the evening far outweighed this.

Overall, about 2,500 fewer people were killed and seriously injured during the first two winters of the experiment.


http://www.rospa.com/roadsafety/info/su ... _paper.pdf
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Guest » Sun Oct 30, 2011 11:18 am

Cannydc wrote:It is exactly as simple as that.

6 hours of daylight in midwinter equates to 9am to 3pm.

So either kids go to school in the dark, or come home in the dark.


It's not ONLY about kids going to and from school. What you are proposing to do would further disadvantage those people in Britain who already have fewer hours of daylight than people further south, by making it even later in the day before they see the first glimmer of any of that daylight. Southerners already have more hours of daylight anyway so why do you always think everything should be done to benefit the South of England even if it disadvantages those elsewhere?
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Guest » Sun Oct 30, 2011 11:20 am

Cannydc wrote:In 1968, there was a three-year experiment when British Standard Time (GMT + 1) was employed all year round; the clocks were advanced in March 1968 and not put back until October 1971.

This period provided an opportunity to evaluate the effect of the daylight change on a number of things, particularly road accident casualties.
A Parliamentary review of the experiment reported that it was impossible to quantify a great many of the more important advantages and disadvantages of this time system and concluded that the final decision on whether to retain the system would rest largely on a qualitative judgement.

There was a wealth of support for the proposal from some sections of the public (The Police Federation, The Sports Council, the leisure industry, Age Concern) but strong opposition from others (the building industry, farmers, the Post Office), particularly those in Scotland.

In 1998, a report, commissioned by the Government, examined the effect of a move to SDST on road accident casualties. This concluded there would be 450 fewer deaths and serious injuries... Every Autumn when the clocks go back and sunset occurs earlier in the day, road casualties and the casualty rate rise.

The effects of clocks going back in October are greatest for the most vulnerable road users. In 2004, pedestrian deaths rose from 56 in October to 76 in November and 78 in December.

During the week, casualty rates peak at 8:00 am and 5:00 pm for adults and 8:00 am and 3.30 pm for children, with the afternoon peak being higher for both the children and adults. The patterns are different at weekends for both adults and children, when casualty rates peak between 12 noon and 1:00 pm and then plateau until about 7:00 pm when they begin to reduce.

As an experiment, British Standard Time (GMT +1 hour) was kept all year round for a three year period between 1968 and 1971. Analysis of accident data during this period indicated that this reduced the number of road accident casualties.

Road casualty figures during the morning (7:00 am – 10:00 am) and afternoon (4:00 pm – 7:00 pm) for the period affected by time change in the two winters (1966/67 and 1967/68) before the experiment and in the first two winters (1968/69 and 1969/70) when BST was retained were analysed.

The data showed that keeping British Standard time had resulted in an 11% reduction in casualties during the hours affected by the time change in England and Wales and a 17% reduction in Scotland. The overall reduction for Great Britain was 11.7%. Although casualties in the morning had increased, the decrease in casualties in the evening far outweighed this.

Overall, about 2,500 fewer people were killed and seriously injured during the first two winters of the experiment.


http://www.rospa.com/roadsafety/info/su ... _paper.pdf


Traffic patterns and lifestyle habits are entirely different now from 40 years ago so that data is of little relevance to today's circumstances.
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Fenella » Sun Oct 30, 2011 11:47 am

Guest wrote:
Cannydc wrote:It is exactly as simple as that.

6 hours of daylight in midwinter equates to 9am to 3pm.

So either kids go to school in the dark, or come home in the dark.


It's not ONLY about kids going to and from school. What you are proposing to do would further disadvantage those people in Britain who already have fewer hours of daylight than people further south, by making it even later in the day before they see the first glimmer of any of that daylight. Southerners already have more hours of daylight anyway so why do you always think everything should be done to benefit the South of England even if it disadvantages those elsewhere?


It's nature - if people want more hours of daylight they should move somewhere else. Tinkering with the clocks all the time just moves those hours of daylight around - it doesn't create more.
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Guest » Sun Oct 30, 2011 11:54 am

Fenella wrote:
Guest wrote:
Cannydc wrote:It is exactly as simple as that.

6 hours of daylight in midwinter equates to 9am to 3pm.

So either kids go to school in the dark, or come home in the dark.


It's not ONLY about kids going to and from school. What you are proposing to do would further disadvantage those people in Britain who already have fewer hours of daylight than people further south, by making it even later in the day before they see the first glimmer of any of that daylight. Southerners already have more hours of daylight anyway so why do you always think everything should be done to benefit the South of England even if it disadvantages those elsewhere?


It's nature - if people want more hours of daylight they should move somewhere else. Tinkering with the clocks all the time just moves those hours of daylight around - it doesn't create more.


Exactly. People who only have six hours of daylight in the depths of winter just deal with it, as they always have done.

If anyone wants 12 hours of daylight all year round, they should go and live in Equatorial Guinea or Ecuador. :thumbsup:
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Guest » Sun Oct 30, 2011 12:00 pm

Energy Costs would be far less, ( A kick in the teeth for the Energy Companies)
Crime Rates would Fall,
Communications with EU Countries would be easier,
Suicide Rates along with Seasonal Depression would fall,
Heart Attacks would fall (according to figures)
Common Accidents rates in the Home and outside would fall,
Lighter evenings means more people would have more time for sports. Healthier Outlook.
Business, shops etc more accessible late afternoon, evenings
Thats without the Road Traffic Accident figures.

Our lifestyle has changed since the last experiment,
The Scottish Farmers milking cows in the dark is no excuse in this day and age.
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Stooo » Sun Oct 30, 2011 12:04 pm

Guest wrote:Energy Costs would be far less, ( A kick in the teeth for the Energy Companies)
Crime Rates would Fall,
Communications with EU Countries would be easier,
Suicide Rates along with Seasonal Depression would fall,
Heart Attacks would fall (according to figures)
Common Accidents rates in the Home and outside would fall,
Lighter evenings means more people would have more time for sports. Healthier Outlook.
Business, shops etc more accessible late afternoon, evenings
Thats without the Road Traffic Accident figures.

Our lifestyle has changed since the last experiment,
The Scottish Farmers milking cows in the dark is no excuse in this day and age.


Yes, farmers work according to the daylight not the clock.
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Guest » Sun Oct 30, 2011 12:25 pm

Stooo wrote:
Guest wrote:Energy Costs would be far less, ( A kick in the teeth for the Energy Companies)
Crime Rates would Fall,
Communications with EU Countries would be easier,
Suicide Rates along with Seasonal Depression would fall,
Heart Attacks would fall (according to figures)
Common Accidents rates in the Home and outside would fall,
Lighter evenings means more people would have more time for sports. Healthier Outlook.
Business, shops etc more accessible late afternoon, evenings
Thats without the Road Traffic Accident figures.

Our lifestyle has changed since the last experiment,
The Scottish Farmers milking cows in the dark is no excuse in this day and age.


Yes, farmers work according to the daylight not the clock.


Most Milking Sheds these days have Electric Lighting,
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Guest » Sun Oct 30, 2011 12:30 pm

You soft Southerners are so bloody pathetic. :pointlaugh:

It isn't going to happen anyway so just man up and deal with it.
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Text » Sun Oct 30, 2011 6:51 pm

@ title: About time and all !! Image
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Big Fat Frosty » Mon Oct 31, 2011 10:14 am

i vote yes
no more turning back the clocks
in this modern age of tractors with lights etc etc
its just bollox
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Guest » Mon Oct 31, 2011 1:22 pm

The new programme is called Daybreak
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby S.A.D » Tue Nov 01, 2011 5:09 pm

5 '0' Clock, and it's fucking dark :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall:
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Guest » Tue Nov 01, 2011 6:11 pm

S.A.D wrote:5 '0' Clock, and it's fucking dark :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall:


Only 7 weeks to go
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Re: The End Of GMT?

Postby Cactus Jack » Wed Nov 02, 2011 12:32 am

Daylight saving time is a relic of when we were a primarily industrial and agricultural economy, so are the long school holidays in summer, and both can be dispensed with.

1 - Stick to GMT year round and adjust the working day if you have to.
2 - In schools, universities and colleges extend the Christmas Holiday to cover the last three weeks of December and the first three weeks of January and only give a two week break in mid-July so we can save millions in heating costs.
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