The Archaeology thread

A right load of bollocks...

Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:03 am

Twenty four of the most remarkable archaeological discoveries of all time. :cuppaT:

http://www.livescience.com/57690-amazin ... eries.html
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby 4ever2 » Wed Feb 01, 2017 4:36 pm

Keyser wrote:
luddite wrote:I have to agree with Ambient here I'm afraid.
I have a local museum and some of the artifacts on display aren't described correctly. I went to a museum in York 30 years ago and saw remains which were described as being 3.4 million years old, when I went recently the notice hadn't been updated and still said 3.4 million years. :brickwall:
So when I see pictures of dinosaurs I go yeah right, that's what they looked like. :doomed:

Yes I agree - because the world's leading archaeologists and palaeontologists are not as reliable as some random bloke ranting in the pub. :thumbsup:

And as our technology and ability to reclassify & identity those well established existing museum displays - lots of misinformation has been shown the light of day; but did the museums ability to fund the cost to reassemble those ancient skeletons and relabel everything in their archives ...not with the continued state funding cuts we've seen for the 'Arts & Sciences' here in America.
The museums are struggling and are trying to keep their doors open for the public, let alone keep the display cases changed to the newest data that has been unearthed by many of the latest scientific discoveries and newest methods how that skeleton moved/what it ate/what the egg layer lived on/what killed it off.
So many 'what ifs' and so little funding for continued conservation/maintenance/ protection from unknowing/uneducated staff that can do such great harm in such little time.
Just for example > http://www.cracked.com/article_20715_6- ... diots.html

Very interesting topic and sad that the subject matter has to be defiled by vulgar/senseless gutter speak/lazy attitudes that could just ignore the entire thread.
Beats the mundane trashing of politics that gets us no where! :whistle:
"In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the SILENCE of our friends." - MLK
"He who passively accepts EVIL is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts EVIL without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." - MLK
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby 4ever2 » Thu Feb 02, 2017 1:55 pm

“Lost continent” found under Mauritius
January 31, 2017
Image
Indian Ocean topography showing the location of Mauritius as part of a chain of progressively older volcanoes extending from the presently active hot-spot of Réunion toward the 65-million-year-old Deccan traps of northwest India. Credit: Wits University
Scientists have confirmed the existence of a “lost continent” under the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius that was left-over by the break-up of the supercontinent, Gondwana, which started about 200 million years ago. The piece of crust, which was subsequently covered by young lava during volcanic eruptions on the island, seems to be a tiny piece of ancient continent, which broke off from the island of Madagascar, when Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica split up and formed the Indian Ocean. ”We are studying the break-up process of the continents, in order to understand the geological history of the planet,” says Wits geologist, Professor Lewis Ashwal, lead author on the paper “Archaean zircons in Miocene oceanic hotspot rocks establish ancient continental crust beneath Mauritius”, published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications.

By studying the mineral, zircon, found in rocks spewed up by lava during volcanic eruptions, Ashwal and his colleagues Michael Wiedenbeck from the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and Trond Torsvik from the University of Oslo, guest scientist at GFZ, have found that remnants of this mineral were far too old to belong on the island of Mauritius.

“Earth is made up of two parts – continents, which are old, and oceans, which are “young”. On the continents you find rocks that are over four billion years old, but you find nothing like that in the oceans, as this is where new rocks are formed,” explains Ashwal. “Mauritius is an island, and there is no rock older than 9 million years old on the island. However, by studying the rocks on the island, we have found zircons that are as old as 3 billion years.”

Zircons are minerals that occur mainly in granites from the continents. They contain trace amounts of uranium, thorium and lead, and due to the fact that they survive geological process very well, they contain a rich record of geological processes and can be dated extremely accurately.

“The fact that we have found zircons of this age proves that there are much older crustal materials under Mauritius that could only have originated from a continent,” says Ashwal. This is not the first time that zircons that are billions of years old have been found on the island. A study done in 2013 has found traces of the mineral in beach sand. However, this study received some criticism, including that the mineral could have been either blown in by the wind, or carried in on vehicle tyres or scientists’ shoes. “The fact that we found the ancient zircons in rock (6-million-year-old trachyte), corroborates the previous study and refutes any suggestion of wind-blown, wave-transported or pumice-rafted zircons for explaining the earlier results,” says Ashwal.

Ashwal suggests that there are many pieces of various sizes of “undiscovered continent”, collectively called “Mauritia”, spread over the Indian Ocean, left over by the breakup of Gondwanaland. “According to the new results, this break-up did not involve a simple splitting of the ancient super-continent of Gondwana, but rather, a complex splintering took place with fragments of continental crust of variable sizes left adrift within the evolving Indian Ocean basin.”

Gondwanaland
Gondwanaland is a super-continent that existed more than 200 million years ago and contained rocks as old as 3.6 billion years old, before it split up into what are now the continents of Africa, South America, Antarctica, India and Australia. The split-up occurred because of the geological process of plate tectonics. This is the process where the ocean basin is in continuous motion, and moves between 2 cm and 11 cm per year. Continents ride on the plates that make up the ocean floor, which causes the movement of the continents.

Mauritius
Known as a tropical holiday destination, Mauritius is a volcanic island, formed by the eruption of volcanoes starting at about nine million years ago. The island forms part of a string of islands, formed by a stationary hotspot (volcano), presently located at Réunion Island. Originating from deep within the earth, the hotspot stays stationary while the ocean’s tectonic plates move across it, creating a string of volcanic islands.
http://www.geologypage.com/2017/01/lost-continent-found-mauritius.html

I've been snorkeling a few times ...but this is a place that I'd love to dive - be down there among the findings and help chart/map/mark the layout for this lost region!
Amazing and exciting times.
"In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the SILENCE of our friends." - MLK
"He who passively accepts EVIL is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts EVIL without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." - MLK
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Thu Feb 02, 2017 8:31 pm

4ever2 wrote:
“Lost continent” found under Mauritius
January 31, 2017
Image
Indian Ocean topography showing the location of Mauritius as part of a chain of progressively older volcanoes extending from the presently active hot-spot of Réunion toward the 65-million-year-old Deccan traps of northwest India. Credit: Wits University
Scientists have confirmed the existence of a “lost continent” under the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius that was left-over by the break-up of the supercontinent, Gondwana, which started about 200 million years ago. The piece of crust, which was subsequently covered by young lava during volcanic eruptions on the island, seems to be a tiny piece of ancient continent, which broke off from the island of Madagascar, when Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica split up and formed the Indian Ocean. ”We are studying the break-up process of the continents, in order to understand the geological history of the planet,” says Wits geologist, Professor Lewis Ashwal, lead author on the paper “Archaean zircons in Miocene oceanic hotspot rocks establish ancient continental crust beneath Mauritius”, published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications.

By studying the mineral, zircon, found in rocks spewed up by lava during volcanic eruptions, Ashwal and his colleagues Michael Wiedenbeck from the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and Trond Torsvik from the University of Oslo, guest scientist at GFZ, have found that remnants of this mineral were far too old to belong on the island of Mauritius.

“Earth is made up of two parts – continents, which are old, and oceans, which are “young”. On the continents you find rocks that are over four billion years old, but you find nothing like that in the oceans, as this is where new rocks are formed,” explains Ashwal. “Mauritius is an island, and there is no rock older than 9 million years old on the island. However, by studying the rocks on the island, we have found zircons that are as old as 3 billion years.”

Zircons are minerals that occur mainly in granites from the continents. They contain trace amounts of uranium, thorium and lead, and due to the fact that they survive geological process very well, they contain a rich record of geological processes and can be dated extremely accurately.

“The fact that we have found zircons of this age proves that there are much older crustal materials under Mauritius that could only have originated from a continent,” says Ashwal. This is not the first time that zircons that are billions of years old have been found on the island. A study done in 2013 has found traces of the mineral in beach sand. However, this study received some criticism, including that the mineral could have been either blown in by the wind, or carried in on vehicle tyres or scientists’ shoes. “The fact that we found the ancient zircons in rock (6-million-year-old trachyte), corroborates the previous study and refutes any suggestion of wind-blown, wave-transported or pumice-rafted zircons for explaining the earlier results,” says Ashwal.

Ashwal suggests that there are many pieces of various sizes of “undiscovered continent”, collectively called “Mauritia”, spread over the Indian Ocean, left over by the breakup of Gondwanaland. “According to the new results, this break-up did not involve a simple splitting of the ancient super-continent of Gondwana, but rather, a complex splintering took place with fragments of continental crust of variable sizes left adrift within the evolving Indian Ocean basin.”

Gondwanaland
Gondwanaland is a super-continent that existed more than 200 million years ago and contained rocks as old as 3.6 billion years old, before it split up into what are now the continents of Africa, South America, Antarctica, India and Australia. The split-up occurred because of the geological process of plate tectonics. This is the process where the ocean basin is in continuous motion, and moves between 2 cm and 11 cm per year. Continents ride on the plates that make up the ocean floor, which causes the movement of the continents.

Mauritius
Known as a tropical holiday destination, Mauritius is a volcanic island, formed by the eruption of volcanoes starting at about nine million years ago. The island forms part of a string of islands, formed by a stationary hotspot (volcano), presently located at Réunion Island. Originating from deep within the earth, the hotspot stays stationary while the ocean’s tectonic plates move across it, creating a string of volcanic islands.
http://www.geologypage.com/2017/01/lost-continent-found-mauritius.html

I've been snorkeling a few times ...but this is a place that I'd love to dive - be down there among the findings and help chart/map/mark the layout for this lost region!
Amazing and exciting times.


Brilliant stuff!

Thank you. :Hiya:
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Mon Feb 20, 2017 8:31 pm

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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Kizzie » Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:19 am

lately, I have been very interested in "out of place" artefacts.
I would say we have probably been lied to about a lot of things.
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Guest » Tue Feb 21, 2017 8:45 pm

Why do so many women like Archaeology?

Because they just love digging up old stuff!

Boom! It's the way I tell em!
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Tue Mar 28, 2017 5:28 pm

Guest wrote:Why do so many women like Archaeology?

Because they just love digging up old stuff!

Boom! It's the way I tell em!


:mrgreen:

A few recent stories that may be of interest. :cuppaT:

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/archa ... er-bronze/

http://www.livescience.com/58433-ancien ... -iraq.html

http://www.livescience.com/58424-mummy- ... found.html
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:49 pm

A wonderful article from the Smithsonian on those mysterious denizens of the past - the bog bodies. :cuppaT:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n ... 180962770/

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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Mon Apr 24, 2017 4:19 pm

The world's oldest temple - Gobekli Tepe - just becomes more and more astonishing.

This story is so incredible that I could not quite believe it when I first read about the discovery today. :cool:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... s-ago.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017 ... bc-wiping/

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-ancient-s ... comet.html

http://www.thelondoneconomic.com/news/w ... urs/21/04/

The paper.

http://maajournal.com/Issues/2017/Vol17 ... 281%29.pdf

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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Tue Apr 25, 2017 9:55 pm

Here is a nice site on Göbekli Tepe that some may find interesting.

http://gobeklitepe.info/
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Thu Apr 27, 2017 4:53 pm

Trump take note.

Although I never would have believed I would be mentioning that buffoon in the same post as the great Hadrian. :mrgreen:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/f ... 180963025/
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Re: The Archaeology thread

Postby Keyser » Fri May 12, 2017 8:45 pm

A nice article from the National Geographic on the revolutionary Pharaoh Akhenaten. :cuppaT:

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magaz ... gypt-king/
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