I really need some sincere help re diabetes

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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Keyser » Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:54 pm

creamcheese wrote:I'm having the same trouble with my mum, she has cancer which is operable but they've told her to lose some weight first as her BP is sky high and she's borderline diabetic both of which could be sorted with diet and exercise. She's a good 6st overweight and as she's only just over 5ft that makes her morbidly obese. I spent hours on websites finding out which foods help lower BP and what to avoid etc. I met her for lunch yesterday, trying to be supportive I ordered a tuna salad thinking she'd go for something similar but no she opted for an all day breakfast and it was a big one, all that salty bacon when I'd already told her that all that salt is bad for her bp. She's only 72, I don't want to lose her but how do you make someone change their lifestyle? I've printed off sheets of really good foods to eat and recipes but I know they're getting ignored in favour of the foods she's used to. Two months after the doc told her to lose weight she's the same weight, she could have lost a couple of stone by now which would have helped with her BP and made the op safer. I'm at my wits end, I don't want to upset her and be horrible but I am one step away from saying ffs you're going to die if you don't change.



I am very sorry to hear about the situation with your mam Creamy - I really hope she takes your advice soon. X
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby creamcheese » Wed Feb 22, 2017 1:07 pm

Thanks Keys I really hope she does. Thing is, my dad lost a couple of stone before his hip replacement as he knew recovery would be much quicker at a healthy weight so he really went for it. I really wish my mum would do the same, old habits die hard though
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby 4ever2 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 1:18 pm

creamcheese wrote:I'm having the same trouble with my mum, she has cancer which is operable but they've told her to lose some weight first as her BP is sky high and she's borderline diabetic both of which could be sorted with diet and exercise. She's a good 6st overweight and as she's only just over 5ft that makes her morbidly obese. I spent hours on websites finding out which foods help lower BP and what to avoid etc. I met her for lunch yesterday, trying to be supportive I ordered a tuna salad thinking she'd go for something similar but no she opted for an all day breakfast and it was a big one, all that salty bacon when I'd already told her that all that salt is bad for her bp. She's only 72, I don't want to lose her but how do you make someone change their lifestyle? I've printed off sheets of really good foods to eat and recipes but I know they're getting ignored in favour of the foods she's used to. Two months after the doc told her to lose weight she's the same weight, she could have lost a couple of stone by now which would have helped with her BP and made the op safer. I'm at my wits end, I don't want to upset her and be horrible but I am one step away from saying ffs you're going to die if you don't change.

Children reversing roles with their parents ...a very difficult position to be in! What parent looks forward to being lectured by their own child?
Walking with her - getting her 'OUT' of her house to get her moving even for just a block at a time or finding an age appropriate work out group that she could socialize with and do modified moving/stretching exercises with, might be the dual life enhancer she'd benefit from. Even just a couple times a week, would boost her spirits and give her a reason too move.
But if you continue to take her out too eat where she has the option to order such grossly diet inappropriate items ...then she will; don't go to those places - go vegan if you're paying - she'll grumble but she might find it interesting as well - something new she's never had before :wubbers:
Check around with 'HER' social group, perhaps she has a buddy that could/would benefit from tag teaming up with you both and making it a scheduled event, good luck! They don't call us the sandwich generation for nothing ...but they sure didn't give us a HAND BOOK either! :shake head:
"In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the SILENCE of our friends." - MLK
"He who passively accepts EVIL is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts EVIL without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." - MLK
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Guest » Wed Feb 22, 2017 4:34 pm

jp761 wrote:
Guest wrote:My youngest was diagnosed type1, two years ago at the age of 6.
He has the pump which injects the insulin as needed. We imput his carb intake for each meal and the computer works out he dose. We also have a monitor called dexacon which reads his sugar levels and when combined with the pump. Gives an accurate readout of his levels, so less need to prick his fingers for blood tests.
At night should he drop below 80, ( he should be between 80-150) an alarm sounds on the dexacon and we test him and give him a glucose tablet. In general though he is no different than any other child his age. He loves his sports and the park. If he's going to be active we let him have orange juice and he burns it off.
We got a nurse for the school for him plus had the para. But got rid of her as she really didn't do anything.
I'm glad your child has the pump and the monitor they tend to give the best equipment to children though which is understandable.

I know middle ages adults who can't get this equipment one of the reasons is that adults activity levels and eating habits tend to be more consistent than young children.




I live in America, I have excellent health coverage. We were given a choice of 3 pumps I think. We picked the best which still cost us over $2000, Last night he was playing basketball. Everything was fine then at about 2am his dexacon started to sound the alarm. He had both arrows pointing straight down and reading 74. He was crashing fast
but he was given two glucose tabs and checked after 15 mins. He went back up and we went back to sleep. He basically slept through it, His alarm rang a further 3 times last night and each time he had glucose tabs.This morning he was back to 74 before breakfast.
Yesterday he mainly ate carb free apart from some white toast. He was very active though and this is what caused his lows during the night.
There was no panic or drama. The alarm rang and we did what we had to do. However without the dexacon machine who knows what could have happened.
Tests are being carried out here at the moment for the pancreas replacement but our boy is too young for the trials, 12 being the minimum age. But he will be getting it if it is successful. Though I do believe he will still have something similar to the pump/dexacon that will release the measured amounts of insulin.
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby jp761 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 5:18 pm

Guest wrote:
jp761 wrote:
Guest wrote:My youngest was diagnosed type1, two years ago at the age of 6.
He has the pump which injects the insulin as needed. We imput his carb intake for each meal and the computer works out he dose. We also have a monitor called dexacon which reads his sugar levels and when combined with the pump. Gives an accurate readout of his levels, so less need to prick his fingers for blood tests.
At night should he drop below 80, ( he should be between 80-150) an alarm sounds on the dexacon and we test him and give him a glucose tablet. In general though he is no different than any other child his age. He loves his sports and the park. If he's going to be active we let him have orange juice and he burns it off.
We got a nurse for the school for him plus had the para. But got rid of her as she really didn't do anything.
I'm glad your child has the pump and the monitor they tend to give the best equipment to children though which is understandable.

I know middle ages adults who can't get this equipment one of the reasons is that adults activity levels and eating habits tend to be more consistent than young children.




I live in America, I have excellent health coverage. We were given a choice of 3 pumps I think. We picked the best which still cost us over $2000, Last night he was playing basketball. Everything was fine then at about 2am his dexacon started to sound the alarm. He had both arrows pointing straight down and reading 74. He was crashing fast
but he was given two glucose tabs and checked after 15 mins. He went back up and we went back to sleep. He basically slept through it, His alarm rang a further 3 times last night and each time he had glucose tabs.This morning he was back to 74 before breakfast.
Yesterday he mainly ate carb free apart from some white toast. He was very active though and this is what caused his lows during the night.
There was no panic or drama. The alarm rang and we did what we had to do. However without the dexacon machine who knows what could have happened.
Tests are being carried out here at the moment for the pancreas replacement but our boy is too young for the trials, 12 being the minimum age. But he will be getting it if it is successful. Though I do believe he will still have something similar to the pump/dexacon that will release the measured amounts of insulin.
Ah I see yes if you can afford it you obviously get the best. Also your blood sugar readings are different 74 is around 4.2 mmol/L here. :D Some people use dextro over here to boost low readings quickly.

I'm glad he's ok the alarm system is great I agree.
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby 4ever2 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 6:32 pm

Guest wrote:
jp761 wrote:
Guest wrote:My youngest was diagnosed type1, two years ago at the age of 6.
He has the pump which injects the insulin as needed. We imput his carb intake for each meal and the computer works out he dose. We also have a monitor called dexacon which reads his sugar levels and when combined with the pump. Gives an accurate readout of his levels, so less need to prick his fingers for blood tests.
At night should he drop below 80, ( he should be between 80-150) an alarm sounds on the dexacon and we test him and give him a glucose tablet. In general though he is no different than any other child his age. He loves his sports and the park. If he's going to be active we let him have orange juice and he burns it off.
We got a nurse for the school for him plus had the para. But got rid of her as she really didn't do anything.
I'm glad your child has the pump and the monitor they tend to give the best equipment to children though which is understandable.

I know middle ages adults who can't get this equipment one of the reasons is that adults activity levels and eating habits tend to be more consistent than young children.

I live in America, I have excellent health coverage. We were given a choice of 3 pumps I think. We picked the best which still cost us over $2000, Last night he was playing basketball. Everything was fine then at about 2am his dexacon started to sound the alarm. He had both arrows pointing straight down and reading 74. He was crashing fast
but he was given two glucose tabs and checked after 15 mins. He went back up and we went back to sleep. He basically slept through it, His alarm rang a further 3 times last night and each time he had glucose tabs.This morning he was back to 74 before breakfast.
Yesterday he mainly ate carb free apart from some white toast. He was very active though and this is what caused his lows during the night.
There was no panic or drama. The alarm rang and we did what we had to do. However without the dexacon machine who knows what could have happened.
Tests are being carried out here at the moment for the pancreas replacement but our boy is too young for the trials, 12 being the minimum age. But he will be getting it if it is successful. Though I do believe he will still have something similar to the pump/dexacon that will release the measured amounts of insulin.

How very fortunate for you - for your child with diabetes, that you can afford the best of the best for health coverage in America.
Sadly that isn't the case for those thousands of little guys that have only their state funded Medicaid 'CHIP' programs to use; like my state - it's been cut & sliced and our Gov. 'WAVERED' the ACA so those additional benefits were denied too!
Yes, changes have been made {forced upon the federal government by people like HRC and her advocate groups fighting for health care for all children in America} but there are still many loop holes and mounds of paper work to file - hoping that they {parents of the needy child} have a physician that will go to battle for their diabetic child in order to obtain those 'safety alarms' that many states are allowed to OPT - OUT of paying for.
But the Medicaid will pay for 'smoking patches' and other aide things to help people STOP SMOKING!!! :shake head:

Medicaid covers the health care needs for qualified low-income people and those who have few resources. There are special expanded eligibility terms for pregnant women. Medicaid is jointly funded by the federal and state governments; covered populations and benefits vary among states. As a condition for receipt of federal funding, states must provide certain services, such as in- and out-patient care, doctor visits and long-term care. While services such as prescription drugs are optional under federal law all states and territories have chosen to include them. Other details of benefits such as prescribed insulin, disposable needles, syringes, monitors and blood glucose strips are determined by each state's Medicaid policy and are listed by state.
The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) formerly known as SCHIP (the State Children's Health Insurance Program) - has become the nation's primary source of coverage for uninsured children who do not qualify under Medicaid. In 2008, 7.4 million children received health coverage through CHIP. The Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) passed in April 2009 both extended and expanded CHIP through September 2013. The federal government covers about 70 percent of the programs' cost nationwide with state governments picking up the rest of the cost. Diabetes treatment and management is available to children enrolled through the CHIP program. Diabetes treatment options are comparable to those available under Medicaid in most states, although patients may be responsible for higher payments and care defined as diabetes education services.
http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/diabetes-health-coverage-state-laws-and-programs.aspx

"In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the SILENCE of our friends." - MLK
"He who passively accepts EVIL is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts EVIL without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." - MLK
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Keyser » Wed Feb 22, 2017 6:57 pm

creamcheese wrote:Thanks Keys I really hope she does. Thing is, my dad lost a couple of stone before his hip replacement as he knew recovery would be much quicker at a healthy weight so he really went for it. I really wish my mum would do the same, old habits die hard though


I wish you all the very best of luck. :smilin: X
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Nosyguest » Wed Feb 22, 2017 10:46 pm

As a diabetic you should not follow a low fat diet. Full fat everything is the way to go. Low fat equals full of sugar. You can have chocolate as well, just stick to 70% or more cocoa because that doesn't have much sugar. Pork scratchings are a great snack and bergen bread or weightwatchers is ok cos it's pretty low carb.
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Stooo » Wed Feb 22, 2017 11:23 pm

Guest wrote:
jp761 wrote:
Guest wrote:My youngest was diagnosed type1, two years ago at the age of 6.
He has the pump which injects the insulin as needed. We imput his carb intake for each meal and the computer works out he dose. We also have a monitor called dexacon which reads his sugar levels and when combined with the pump. Gives an accurate readout of his levels, so less need to prick his fingers for blood tests.
At night should he drop below 80, ( he should be between 80-150) an alarm sounds on the dexacon and we test him and give him a glucose tablet. In general though he is no different than any other child his age. He loves his sports and the park. If he's going to be active we let him have orange juice and he burns it off.
We got a nurse for the school for him plus had the para. But got rid of her as she really didn't do anything.
I'm glad your child has the pump and the monitor they tend to give the best equipment to children though which is understandable.

I know middle ages adults who can't get this equipment one of the reasons is that adults activity levels and eating habits tend to be more consistent than young children.




I live in America, I have excellent health coverage. We were given a choice of 3 pumps I think. We picked the best which still cost us over $2000, Last night he was playing basketball. Everything was fine then at about 2am his dexacon started to sound the alarm. He had both arrows pointing straight down and reading 74. He was crashing fast
but he was given two glucose tabs and checked after 15 mins. He went back up and we went back to sleep. He basically slept through it, His alarm rang a further 3 times last night and each time he had glucose tabs.This morning he was back to 74 before breakfast.
Yesterday he mainly ate carb free apart from some white toast. He was very active though and this is what caused his lows during the night.
There was no panic or drama. The alarm rang and we did what we had to do. However without the dexacon machine who knows what could have happened.
Tests are being carried out here at the moment for the pancreas replacement but our boy is too young for the trials, 12 being the minimum age. But he will be getting it if it is successful. Though I do believe he will still have something similar to the pump/dexacon that will release the measured amounts of insulin.


IP resolves to Moscow... :yikes:
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Canucklehead » Thu Feb 23, 2017 12:37 pm

Nosyguest wrote:As a diabetic you should not follow a low fat diet. Full fat everything is the way to go. Low fat equals full of sugar. You can have chocolate as well, just stick to 70% or more cocoa because that doesn't have much sugar. Pork scratchings are a great snack and bergen bread or weightwatchers is ok cos it's pretty low carb.


There is something to be said for low carb eating to combat diabetes, obesity, and other conditions. For most people, carbs aren't a big problem, but when you're obese you can often have problems with blood sugar and carbs do NOT help with this. Vegetables and small amounts of fruit are okay, but breads, cereals, and junk food need to be cut out or reduced substantially. Things are beginning to change but overall patients are still advised to eat low-fat foods when managing diabetes or losing weight. Low carb works, but it takes effort because most of our meals in our culture are based around bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, or some other carb. It takes thinking outside the box and not everyone is up for that. Many doctors also don't recommend it because it goes against the grain and contradicts the advice we've been given for the better part of 5-6 decades. If you look into it, you will find that the low-fat mantra was initially based on poor evidence.

I always think how did our ancestors manage to not be obese? It sure wasn't down to calorie counting and keeping track of our exercise. They ate real food, they ate fat, not much that was sweet, and definitely no processed food going on. That can be a big ask in our modern food culture, but what I'm trying to say is calorie counting and wearing a fit-bit or pedometer is not necessary to lose weight and be healthy.
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby jp761 » Thu Feb 23, 2017 3:46 pm

Canucklehead wrote:
Nosyguest wrote:As a diabetic you should not follow a low fat diet. Full fat everything is the way to go. Low fat equals full of sugar. You can have chocolate as well, just stick to 70% or more cocoa because that doesn't have much sugar. Pork scratchings are a great snack and bergen bread or weightwatchers is ok cos it's pretty low carb.


There is something to be said for low carb eating to combat diabetes, obesity, and other conditions. For most people, carbs aren't a big problem, but when you're obese you can often have problems with blood sugar and carbs do NOT help with this. Vegetables and small amounts of fruit are okay, but breads, cereals, and junk food need to be cut out or reduced substantially. Things are beginning to change but overall patients are still advised to eat low-fat foods when managing diabetes or losing weight. Low carb works, but it takes effort because most of our meals in our culture are based around bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, or some other carb. It takes thinking outside the box and not everyone is up for that. Many doctors also don't recommend it because it goes against the grain and contradicts the advice we've been given for the better part of 5-6 decades. If you look into it, you will find that the low-fat mantra was initially based on poor evidence.

I always think how did our ancestors manage to not be obese? It sure wasn't down to calorie counting and keeping track of our exercise. They ate real food, they ate fat, not much that was sweet, and definitely no processed food going on. That can be a big ask in our modern food culture, but what I'm trying to say is calorie counting and wearing a fit-bit or pedometer is not necessary to lose weight and be healthy.
I know you're mainly talking about prevention. But low carbs doesn't work for people with type 1 diabetes they need a decent amount of carbs.

Lots of people don't understand the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes I'm not saying you are one of those though. Because I don't actually know if you do or not.
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Guest » Thu Feb 23, 2017 4:04 pm

Stooo wrote:
Guest wrote:
jp761 wrote:
Guest wrote:My youngest was diagnosed type1, two years ago at the age of 6.
He has the pump which injects the insulin as needed. We imput his carb intake for each meal and the computer works out he dose. We also have a monitor called dexacon which reads his sugar levels and when combined with the pump. Gives an accurate readout of his levels, so less need to prick his fingers for blood tests.
At night should he drop below 80, ( he should be between 80-150) an alarm sounds on the dexacon and we test him and give him a glucose tablet. In general though he is no different than any other child his age. He loves his sports and the park. If he's going to be active we let him have orange juice and he burns it off.
We got a nurse for the school for him plus had the para. But got rid of her as she really didn't do anything.
I'm glad your child has the pump and the monitor they tend to give the best equipment to children though which is understandable.

I know middle ages adults who can't get this equipment one of the reasons is that adults activity levels and eating habits tend to be more consistent than young children.




I live in America, I have excellent health coverage. We were given a choice of 3 pumps I think. We picked the best which still cost us over $2000, Last night he was playing basketball. Everything was fine then at about 2am his dexacon started to sound the alarm. He had both arrows pointing straight down and reading 74. He was crashing fast
but he was given two glucose tabs and checked after 15 mins. He went back up and we went back to sleep. He basically slept through it, His alarm rang a further 3 times last night and each time he had glucose tabs.This morning he was back to 74 before breakfast.
Yesterday he mainly ate carb free apart from some white toast. He was very active though and this is what caused his lows during the night.
There was no panic or drama. The alarm rang and we did what we had to do. However without the dexacon machine who knows what could have happened.
Tests are being carried out here at the moment for the pancreas replacement but our boy is too young for the trials, 12 being the minimum age. But he will be getting it if it is successful. Though I do believe he will still have something similar to the pump/dexacon that will release the measured amounts of insulin.


IP resolves to Moscow... :yikes:





Yes, modern technology is great if you know how to use it properly. I can actually piggy back my Internet access off your next door neighbor. If I choose to.
The scary part of all this technology is even though people turn off the camera on their devices. It's really easy to reactivate them and the owner be none the wiser.
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Canucklehead » Thu Feb 23, 2017 5:01 pm

jp761 wrote:I know you're mainly talking about prevention. But low carbs doesn't work for people with type 1 diabetes they need a decent amount of carbs.

Lots of people don't understand the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes I'm not saying you are one of those though. Because I don't actually know if you do or not.


I'm also talking about treatment, but yes, I was referring to type 2, which is often brought on by obesity. Many people see type 2 as a life sentence, medication forever. It doesn't have to be. I wouldn't say there is a cure, but through proper diet it can be very manageable. It is really hard though to give up carbs after a lifetime habit, especially those who comfort eat (hello obesity). What do people usually say is their comfort food? Mac'n'cheese, bread & butter, cookies, cake, etc. It is almost exclusively carb-heavy foods.
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby jp761 » Thu Feb 23, 2017 5:12 pm

Canucklehead wrote:
jp761 wrote:I know you're mainly talking about prevention. But low carbs doesn't work for people with type 1 diabetes they need a decent amount of carbs.

Lots of people don't understand the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes I'm not saying you are one of those though. Because I don't actually know if you do or not.


I'm also talking about treatment, but yes, I was referring to type 2, which is often brought on by obesity. Many people see type 2 as a life sentence, medication forever. It doesn't have to be. I wouldn't say there is a cure, but through proper diet it can be very manageable. It is really hard though to give up carbs after a lifetime habit, especially those who comfort eat (hello obesity). What do people usually say is their comfort food? Mac'n'cheese, bread & butter, cookies, cake, etc. It is almost exclusively carb-heavy foods.
Yes type 2 diabetes is often somewhat the fault of the individual.

I just know one or two type 1 diabetics who from time to time get a tad annoyed being tarred with the same brush. Some people do need to look up the differences.
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Re: I really need some sincere help re diabetes

Postby Canucklehead » Thu Feb 23, 2017 5:37 pm

jp761 wrote:Yes type 2 diabetes is often somewhat the fault of the individual.

I just know one or two type 1 diabetics who from time to time get a tad annoyed being tarred with the same brush. Some people do need to look up the differences.


The discussions about diabetes do tend to be about type 2 because it's the one that is preventable and often reversible. Wouldn't make much sense to tell a type 1 what to eat to get better. AFAIK, they are insulin-dependent for life. Eating well will probably extend their life as much as it will with any other person, but they will still always have it.
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