Legacy

Nice threads, no trolling please.
Forum rules
Comments are the responsibility of the poster

Re: Legacy

Postby art0hur0moh » Wed Aug 22, 2018 12:56 am

User avatar
art0hur0moh
 
Posts: 3964
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 9:15 am

Re: Legacy

Postby jra » Wed Aug 22, 2018 3:23 am

art0hur0moh wrote:Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Not just the great western railway. But also shipping. Just discovered the Corporation and City amalgamated crests.

Though that I think is still minor. It is his contribution to medicine which has stood the test of time.

Can't recall the details. However a penny managed to find it's way into his lung. After a time he started to get ill. Doctors couldn't do anything. Weeks passed till eventually Brunel flipped (literally, but that comes later in the tale) his nut. He concluded gravity got it in there so maybe gravity could get it out. He rigged a table on a cantilever, strapped himself on so he could remain comfortable while he was upside down. Once again not clear on details but the penny eventuall left his lung and a new medical insight was discovered.

As yet I am still to discover what exactly that medical insight was.


This book has quite a large chapter on The Great Eastern.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/000 ... UTF8&psc=1
User avatar
jra
 
Posts: 12506
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 10:02 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby xtras1 » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:24 pm

I notice how most of your candidates are men.. that says a lot :snooty:


My first choice for leading the path for many is Katherine McCormick;

Katharine McCormick was a biologist, suffragist, and philanthropist best known for funding most of the research leading to the development of the first birth control pill. She left a $5 million bequest to the School of Medicine in 1967. The fund she endowed sustains several initiatives supporting the advancement of women in medicine, including faculty awards that provide research funding, travel funds to enable women to attend professional development seminars, and an annual lecture.
User avatar
xtras1
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Wed May 30, 2018 7:08 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby xtras1 » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:29 pm

Rosa Parks... you know why .
User avatar
xtras1
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Wed May 30, 2018 7:08 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby Keyser » Wed Aug 22, 2018 9:44 pm

xtras1 wrote:I notice how most of your candidates are men.. that says a lot :snooty:


My first choice for leading the path for many is Katherine McCormick;

Katharine McCormick was a biologist, suffragist, and philanthropist best known for funding most of the research leading to the development of the first birth control pill. She left a $5 million bequest to the School of Medicine in 1967. The fund she endowed sustains several initiatives supporting the advancement of women in medicine, including faculty awards that provide research funding, travel funds to enable women to attend professional development seminars, and an annual lecture.


Bloody woman should have stayed in the kitchen and did the ironing. :Lucia:
User avatar
Keyser
 
Posts: 12702
Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2015 7:25 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby xtras1 » Thu Aug 23, 2018 3:42 pm

Keyser wrote:
xtras1 wrote:I notice how most of your candidates are men.. that says a lot :snooty:


My first choice for leading the path for many is Katherine McCormick;

Katharine McCormick was a biologist, suffragist, and philanthropist best known for funding most of the research leading to the development of the first birth control pill. She left a $5 million bequest to the School of Medicine in 1967. The fund she endowed sustains several initiatives supporting the advancement of women in medicine, including faculty awards that provide research funding, travel funds to enable women to attend professional development seminars, and an annual lecture.


Bloody woman should have stayed in the kitchen and did the ironing. :Lucia:



Thank goodness so many women have left a legacy.. so arseholes like you can no longer hold that decision.


I will find some more when I have the time :)
User avatar
xtras1
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Wed May 30, 2018 7:08 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby Ray of Sunshine » Thu Aug 23, 2018 4:36 pm

Well women did give birth to all these male legacy-leavers.

And there's Jane Austen, she left a legacy of books that are endlessly being dramatised.

And things would have turned out very differently had the Spanish Armada not been defeated so props to ER I for that.
User avatar
Ray of Sunshine
 
Posts: 3723
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2014 8:40 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby Ray of Sunshine » Thu Aug 23, 2018 4:40 pm

calitom wrote:
and superior or equal to any of these people..anyone who has cared for or brought up a disabled child and/or taken care of the disabled and sick.


Like David Cameron?

He doesn't exactly get much respect.
User avatar
Ray of Sunshine
 
Posts: 3723
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2014 8:40 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby jra » Thu Aug 23, 2018 9:34 pm

art0hur0moh wrote:Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Not just the great western railway. But also shipping. Just discovered the Corporation and City amalgamated crests.

Though that I think is still minor. It is his contribution to medicine which has stood the test of time.

Can't recall the details. However a penny managed to find it's way into his lung. After a time he started to get ill. Doctors couldn't do anything. Weeks passed till eventually Brunel flipped (literally, but that comes later in the tale) his nut. He concluded gravity got it in there so maybe gravity could get it out. He rigged a table on a cantilever, strapped himself on so he could remain comfortable while he was upside down. Once again not clear on details but the penny eventuall left his lung and a new medical insight was discovered.

As yet I am still to discover what exactly that medical insight was.


GWML vid.

phpBB [video]


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCEyKrkVa2I&t=3m35s

The track that isn't as straight as people think it is even at 125mph.
User avatar
jra
 
Posts: 12506
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 10:02 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby art0hur0moh » Mon Oct 01, 2018 5:37 am

xtras1 wrote:Rosa Parks... you know why .

I did know why but may require a reminder at some futre date since I just did a search. Aside from that how dose that quote go again? "behind every great man are enflamed cheeks." something like that?
User avatar
art0hur0moh
 
Posts: 3964
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 9:15 am

Re: Legacy

Postby jra » Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:56 pm

xtras1 wrote:I notice how most of your candidates are men.. that says a lot :snooty:


My first choice for leading the path for many is Katherine McCormick;

Katharine McCormick was a biologist, suffragist, and philanthropist best known for funding most of the research leading to the development of the first birth control pill. She left a $5 million bequest to the School of Medicine in 1967. The fund she endowed sustains several initiatives supporting the advancement of women in medicine, including faculty awards that provide research funding, travel funds to enable women to attend professional development seminars, and an annual lecture.


It says that men did and still do invent/design most stuff, but you'll still get the usual retort that it's because women have been oppressed throughout history, which is somewhat true, but now we're in the 21st century that shouldn't be an excuse in most democratic countries, so prove your worth in these days of equality.
User avatar
jra
 
Posts: 12506
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 10:02 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby jra » Tue Oct 02, 2018 5:20 am

The HST/Intercity 125/Class 43, plus mark III carriages.

As people in the know will know these are mostly being phased out to be replaced by the class 800/801/802 (Hitachi Super Express), as the former have provided good service since 1975-1982. Thankfully a few sets are being kept on after a refurbishment, e.g fitting of electrically operating doors, rather than slam doors.

Pros.
Still holds the official world speed record for fastest diesel train to this day.
Excellent acceleration at the time for a diesel train.
Quiet air conditioning.
Excellent sound proofing in the carriages.
Excellent ride comfort.
Very good crash resistance, due to body shell build.

Cons.
The earlier engines in the locomotives were very noisy (Paxman Valenta), but enthusiasts referred to it as 'Valenta Scream'. Later fitted/replacement MTU engines are much quieter.
Slam doors. An HSE heart attack. The remaining HSTs are being retrofitted with electrical operating doors.
The inter carriage door opening floor mats. Problematic. Sometimes the inter carriage doors would remain open when they should have been closed.
Opening windows over the exit doors, as you need these to get out of the train.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intercity ... _Programme

Valenta Sunset. THE MOTHER OF ALL HST STARTS

phpBB [video]


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1ICcOu0NkM
User avatar
jra
 
Posts: 12506
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 10:02 pm

Re: Legacy

Postby art0hur0moh » Wed Oct 03, 2018 7:18 pm

jra wrote:The HST/Intercity 125/Class 43, plus mark III carriages.

As people in the know will know these are mostly being phased out to be replaced by the class 800/801/802 (Hitachi Super Express), as the former have provided good service since 1975-1982. Thankfully a few sets are being kept on after a refurbishment, e.g fitting of electrically operating doors, rather than slam doors.

Pros.
Still holds the official world speed record for fastest diesel train to this day.
Excellent acceleration at the time for a diesel train.
Quiet air conditioning.
Excellent sound proofing in the carriages.
Excellent ride comfort.
Very good crash resistance, due to body shell build.

Cons.
The earlier engines in the locomotives were very noisy (Paxman Valenta), but enthusiasts referred to it as 'Valenta Scream'. Later fitted/replacement MTU engines are much quieter.
Slam doors. An HSE heart attack. The remaining HSTs are being retrofitted with electrical operating doors.
The inter carriage door opening floor mats. Problematic. Sometimes the inter carriage doors would remain open when they should have been closed.
Opening windows over the exit doors, as you need these to get out of the train.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intercity ... _Programme

Valenta Sunset. THE MOTHER OF ALL HST STARTS

phpBB [video]


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1ICcOu0NkM
I don't know what it is about trains I like but I do like trains. Used to walk the dog along the old rail way, not neglecting it is safer than walking on "public highways and byways." And to think if it wasn't for the national rail lines we wouldn't have a standard national time ( not that I think makes much of a difference I woul prefer knowing the correct time).
User avatar
art0hur0moh
 
Posts: 3964
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 9:15 am

Re: Legacy

Postby jra » Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:33 am

art0hur0moh wrote:
jra wrote:The HST/Intercity 125/Class 43, plus mark III carriages.

As people in the know will know these are mostly being phased out to be replaced by the class 800/801/802 (Hitachi Super Express), as the former have provided good service since 1975-1982. Thankfully a few sets are being kept on after a refurbishment, e.g fitting of electrically operating doors, rather than slam doors.

Pros.
Still holds the official world speed record for fastest diesel train to this day.
Excellent acceleration at the time for a diesel train.
Quiet air conditioning.
Excellent sound proofing in the carriages.
Excellent ride comfort.
Very good crash resistance, due to body shell build.

Cons.
The earlier engines in the locomotives were very noisy (Paxman Valenta), but enthusiasts referred to it as 'Valenta Scream'. Later fitted/replacement MTU engines are much quieter.
Slam doors. An HSE heart attack. The remaining HSTs are being retrofitted with electrical operating doors.
The inter carriage door opening floor mats. Problematic. Sometimes the inter carriage doors would remain open when they should have been closed.
Opening windows over the exit doors, as you need these to get out of the train.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intercity ... _Programme

Valenta Sunset. THE MOTHER OF ALL HST STARTS

phpBB [video]


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1ICcOu0NkM
I don't know what it is about trains I like but I do like trains. Used to walk the dog along the old rail way, not neglecting it is safer than walking on "public highways and byways." And to think if it wasn't for the national rail lines we wouldn't have a standard national time ( not that I think makes much of a difference I woul prefer knowing the correct time).


Standard national time aka the GMT/BST time zone in the UK was introduced to make timetabling easier. When the fastest mode of transport was a galloping horse, it didn't really matter that the real/actual time in London was different from say Plymouth, but when trains and other faster modes of transport came into the picture timetabling became a nightmare, so that's partly why we have standard timetables in order to make it easier for long distance travel. It's difficult enough as it is to produce timetables for our densely used railway network for one time zone, let alone factor in the real/actual time from place to place.
User avatar
jra
 
Posts: 12506
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 10:02 pm

Previous

Return to The Sleeping Dogs' Snug

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests