Can we give up plastic?

Can we give up plastic?

Postby Holly » Mon Jul 16, 2018 7:10 am

How would we go without plastic? Can we do without straws, nappies, drink bottles, takeaway containers, shopping bags, food wrappers, ice cream containers, buckets, microwave dishes, storage containers etc...the list is without end...can we do it?
If so, how will we manage?...any ideas?
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Rolluplostinspace » Mon Jul 16, 2018 7:13 am

Instead of giving them up we need to change what they're made from.
Hemp.
Mass planting on a global scale would give us all the paper and plastic and diesel we need.
It'll grow in every country on almost any soil with no chemicals and it improves the soil and saves the forests.
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Holly » Mon Jul 16, 2018 7:16 am

Rolluplostinspace wrote:Instead of giving them up we need to change what they're made from.
Hemp.
Mass planting on a global scale would give us all the paper and plastic and diesel we need.
It'll grow in every country on almost any soil with no chemicals and it improves the soil and saves the forests.



Yes, that a good idea and sounds appealing, but how long will that take to accomplish?
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Lady Murasaki » Mon Jul 16, 2018 7:37 am

I also think that rather than giving it up we need to replace it with something more environmentally friendly. We can give up anything if we are motivated enough to do so. Carrier bags are no longer used as much as they were a few years ago and they aren’t missed at all.
Give us alternatives and we’ll happily change/adapt.
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Rolluplostinspace » Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:30 am

Holly wrote:
Rolluplostinspace wrote:Instead of giving them up we need to change what they're made from.
Hemp.
Mass planting on a global scale would give us all the paper and plastic and diesel we need.
It'll grow in every country on almost any soil with no chemicals and it improves the soil and saves the forests.



Yes, that a good idea and sounds appealing, but how long will that take to accomplish?

Setting up the hemp growing and processing can be quick apparently.
Dismantling the oil to plastic side of things is a huge problem.
When you drive past huge petrochemical plants usually with a big flame burning that is business on a huge scale.
Breaking down what exists is always difficult and this of course is global.To save the world/oceans there would have to be massive processing plants and distribution and new markets put in place.
So it is a big deal I suppose.
Hemp can be sown in rough stony ground dryish land mountainsides just about any climate and the first crop will be ready in sixteen weeks.
Hemp can replace all paper saving the forests and hemp can be harvested three times a year in most places.Trees take years to grow hemp takes weeks.
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Holly » Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:37 am

Rolluplostinspace wrote:
Holly wrote:
Rolluplostinspace wrote:Instead of giving them up we need to change what they're made from.
Hemp.
Mass planting on a global scale would give us all the paper and plastic and diesel we need.
It'll grow in every country on almost any soil with no chemicals and it improves the soil and saves the forests.



Yes, that a good idea and sounds appealing, but how long will that take to accomplish?

Setting up the hemp growing and processing can be quick apparently.
Dismantling the oil to plastic side of things is a huge problem.
When you drive past huge petrochemical plants usually with a big flame burning that is business on a huge scale.
Breaking down what exists is always difficult and this of course is global.To save the world/oceans there would have to be massive processing plants and distribution and new markets put in place.
So it is a big deal I suppose.
Hemp can be sown in rough stony ground dryish land mountainsides just about any climate and the first crop will be ready in sixteen weeks.
Hemp can replace all paper saving the forests and hemp can be harvested three times a year in most places.Trees take years to grow hemp takes weeks.


I like the idea of hemp, and if it doesn't take long to grow, why haven't we changed to hemp already? I don't think the average shopper gives a toss, as long as the products we buy are convenient, it doesn't need to be plastic. In NZ we are already given dirty looks in supermarkets if we don't bring our own bags, we even get into a draws to win big prices if we bring our own and people are happy to go along. I can't see the problem with using hemp instead of plastic...the question is, can it be done? Is it cost effective for the supplier?
NZ used to have large paper bags before plastic, what was wrong with them? :dunno:
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Cannydc » Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:09 am

In much the same way that we have (by needs must) developed hi-tech solutions for CFCs, exhaust pollutants (catalysers), and developed electric cars, so as demand rises we shall, and already have developed bio-degradable and crucially cheap, practical versions of plastic.
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Lady Murasaki » Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:17 am

Cannydc wrote:In much the same way that we have (by needs must) developed hi-tech solutions for CFCs, exhaust pollutants (catalysers), and developed electric cars, so as demand rises we shall, and already have developed bio-degradable and crucially cheap, practical versions of plastic.



Yes, it’s about sustenance. We can’t go back to wood/paper because there just aren’t enough trees and the labour costs are just too much for the demand.
Biodegradable plastics are already becoming quite popular, people are ready for the alternatives.
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Rolluplostinspace » Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:51 am

Lady Murasaki wrote:
Cannydc wrote:In much the same way that we have (by needs must) developed hi-tech solutions for CFCs, exhaust pollutants (catalysers), and developed electric cars, so as demand rises we shall, and already have developed bio-degradable and crucially cheap, practical versions of plastic.



Yes, it’s about sustenance. We can’t go back to wood/paper because there just aren’t enough trees and the labour costs are just too much for the demand.
Biodegradable plastics are already becoming quite popular, people are ready for the alternatives.

Hemp replaces tress for paper.
Hemp replaces oil for plastics paints varnishes.
It would also bring new agricultural industries and many could be family sized.
The sowing is standard.
The growing is mostly leave it alone.
The harvesting is mechanised so it isn't to labour intensive.
The retting is also mechanised.
When hemp is used for paper or as biofuel it is carbon neutral.
Another one apparently is seaweed but I know nothing about that.
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Lady Murasaki » Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:56 am

Rolluplostinspace wrote:
Lady Murasaki wrote:
Cannydc wrote:In much the same way that we have (by needs must) developed hi-tech solutions for CFCs, exhaust pollutants (catalysers), and developed electric cars, so as demand rises we shall, and already have developed bio-degradable and crucially cheap, practical versions of plastic.



Yes, it’s about sustenance. We can’t go back to wood/paper because there just aren’t enough trees and the labour costs are just too much for the demand.
Biodegradable plastics are already becoming quite popular, people are ready for the alternatives.

Hemp replaces tress for paper.
Hemp replaces oil for plastics paints varnishes.
It would also bring new agricultural industries and many could be family sized.
The sowing is standard.
The growing is mostly leave it alone.
The harvesting is mechanised so it isn't to labour intensive.
The retting is also mechanised.
When hemp is used for paper or as biofuel it is carbon neutral.
Another one apparently is seaweed but I know nothing about that.


It would need a lot of land to grow it to an extent to make a real difference. Do farmers/landowners have enough faith in its profitability to invest in it?
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Rolluplostinspace » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:21 am

Lady Murasaki wrote:
Rolluplostinspace wrote:
Lady Murasaki wrote:
Cannydc wrote:In much the same way that we have (by needs must) developed hi-tech solutions for CFCs, exhaust pollutants (catalysers), and developed electric cars, so as demand rises we shall, and already have developed bio-degradable and crucially cheap, practical versions of plastic.



Yes, it’s about sustenance. We can’t go back to wood/paper because there just aren’t enough trees and the labour costs are just too much for the demand.
Biodegradable plastics are already becoming quite popular, people are ready for the alternatives.

Hemp replaces tress for paper.
Hemp replaces oil for plastics paints varnishes.
It would also bring new agricultural industries and many could be family sized.
The sowing is standard.
The growing is mostly leave it alone.
The harvesting is mechanised so it isn't to labour intensive.
The retting is also mechanised.
When hemp is used for paper or as biofuel it is carbon neutral.
Another one apparently is seaweed but I know nothing about that.


It would need a lot of land to grow it to an extent to make a real difference. Do farmers/landowners have enough faith in its profitability to invest in it?

I reckon so.
This stuff will grow on more or less any land with no pesticides or other chemical crap.
It's actuall started taking off a few years ago for paper oils textiles so needs accelerating.
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Rolluplostinspace » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:29 am

Can hemp save the planet?
Jack Herer reckons so.

If you can prove him wrong you can claim $100,000.
The Emperor Wears No Clothes. https://jackherer.com/emperor-3/
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HerersHemp.jpg
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Lady Murasaki » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:33 am

Rolluplostinspace wrote:
Lady Murasaki wrote:
Rolluplostinspace wrote:
Lady Murasaki wrote:
Cannydc wrote:In much the same way that we have (by needs must) developed hi-tech solutions for CFCs, exhaust pollutants (catalysers), and developed electric cars, so as demand rises we shall, and already have developed bio-degradable and crucially cheap, practical versions of plastic.



Yes, it’s about sustenance. We can’t go back to wood/paper because there just aren’t enough trees and the labour costs are just too much for the demand.
Biodegradable plastics are already becoming quite popular, people are ready for the alternatives.

Hemp replaces tress for paper.
Hemp replaces oil for plastics paints varnishes.
It would also bring new agricultural industries and many could be family sized.
The sowing is standard.
The growing is mostly leave it alone.
The harvesting is mechanised so it isn't to labour intensive.
The retting is also mechanised.
When hemp is used for paper or as biofuel it is carbon neutral.
Another one apparently is seaweed but I know nothing about that.


It would need a lot of land to grow it to an extent to make a real difference. Do farmers/landowners have enough faith in its profitability to invest in it?

I reckon so.
This stuff will grow on more or less any land with no pesticides or other chemical crap.
It's actuall started taking off a few years ago for paper oils textiles so needs accelerating.


I know they grow it in India, they need to start manufacturing it on a larger industrial scale. It needs a humid, mild climate.
People here are too interested in growing maruhana, grow hemp instead! :gigglesnshit:
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Rolluplostinspace » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:36 am

Lady Murasaki wrote:
Rolluplostinspace wrote:
Lady Murasaki wrote:
Rolluplostinspace wrote:
Lady Murasaki wrote:

Hemp replaces tress for paper.
Hemp replaces oil for plastics paints varnishes.
It would also bring new agricultural industries and many could be family sized.
The sowing is standard.
The growing is mostly leave it alone.
The harvesting is mechanised so it isn't to labour intensive.
The retting is also mechanised.
When hemp is used for paper or as biofuel it is carbon neutral.
Another one apparently is seaweed but I know nothing about that.


It would need a lot of land to grow it to an extent to make a real difference. Do farmers/landowners have enough faith in its profitability to invest in it?

I reckon so.
This stuff will grow on more or less any land with no pesticides or other chemical crap.
It's actuall started taking off a few years ago for paper oils textiles so needs accelerating.


I know they grow it in India, they need to start manufacturing it on a larger industrial scale. It needs a humid, mild climate.
People here are too interested in growing maruhana, grow hemp instead! :gigglesnshit:




Weed and hemp grow in temperate zones very well.
Grows in tropical zones.
Grows on the side of mountains in Nepal.
Grows in very dry near desert conditions.
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Re: Can we give up plastic?

Postby Rolluplostinspace » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:38 am

Henry Ford's first cars were to be made of hemp and fueled by hemp.
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